Skip to main content

SPORTS

Explore the exhilarating world of winter sports. From timeless disciplines like freestyle skiing and artistic ice skating to thrilling newcomers like ice hockey and snowboarding, the sports on the programme demand everything ranging between speed, precision, resilience, and explosive power. Discover the essence of the disciplines!

Only the athletes properly entered by their NOCs within the deadlines for entries, and according to the age categories and official quotas are eligible to take part in the EYOF 2025.
The qualification criteria are fully in the control of the respective NOC and/or National Federations with the exception of team sports where the qualification system of teams is determined by the EOC.
 

Alpine Skiing

Alpine skiing, a thrilling sport featured in EYOF, offers young athletes the excitement of racing down snow-covered slopes at high speeds. It combines adrenaline, skill, and stunning mountain scenery, making it an exciting winter activity that fosters competition, and a love for the outdoors. Join the fun and challenge yourself on the slopes!  

Biathlon

Biathlon, a dynamic sport featured in EYOF, combines the excitement of cross-country skiing with the precision of rifle shooting. This unique blend of endurance and focus challenges young athletes, offering a thrilling winter experience that tests both physical stamina and mental sharpness. Embrace the adventure and aim for greatness! 

Opción 1

Freestyle Skiing

Freestyle skiing, a highlight of EYOF, offers young athletes the chance to showcase their creativity and daring on snow. With disciplines like big air, and slopestyle, this sport combines acrobatics and skiing, providing an exhilarating experience that encourages expression and skill. Dive into the excitement and soar through the air! 

Figure Skating

Figure skating, a captivating sport at EYOF, blends athleticism and artistry on ice. Young skaters perform intricate routines with grace and precision, showcasing jumps, spins, and elegant footwork. Embrace the beauty and challenge of figure skating, and express yourself in this enchanting winter sport! 


Ice Hockey

Ice hockey, an action-packed sport featured at EYOF, combines speed, strategy, and teamwork. Young athletes skate on ice, handling the puck with precision and skill, while striving to score goals against their opponents. Dive into the excitement and intensity of ice hockey, and be part of this dynamic winter sport! 

Short Track 

Short track speed skating, an exhilarating sport at EYOF, combines high-speed racing with tactical strategy on a compact ice track. Young athletes navigate tight turns and sprint to the finish, showcasing agility, speed, and nerve. Experience the intensity and thrill of short track speed skating, where every race is a test of skill and determination! 

Cross-Country Skiing

Cross-country skiing, a cornerstone of EYOF, invites young athletes to glide through snowy landscapes using their own strength and endurance. This sport promotes fitness, resilience, and a deep connection with nature. Discover the joy of pushing your limits and exploring winter wonderlands on skis! 

Snowboard

Snowboard, an electrifying sport at EYOF, lets young athletes carve their own path down snow-covered slopes. With events like big air, and slopestyle, it blends creativity, speed, and agility. Experience the freedom and adrenaline of snowboard and ride the mountain your way! 

Alpine Skiing

Skiing has an ancient history. The birth of modern downhill skiing is often dated to the 1850s, when Norwegian legend Sondre Norheim popularized skis with curved sides, bindings with stiff heel bands made of willow, as well as the Telemark and Christiania (slalom) turns.

Skiing changed from a method of transportation into a sporting activity during the late 19th century. The first non-military skiing competitions are reported to have been held in the 1840s in northern and central Norway.

Men’s and women’s Alpine skiing both debuted on the Olympic program in 1936 at Garmisch-Partenkirchen.

Biathlon

Biathlon combines the power and aggression of cross-country skiing with the precision and calm of marksmanship. The word “biathlon” stems from the Greek word for two contests, and is today seen as the joining of two sports: skiing and shooting. Biathlon has its roots in survival skills practiced in the snow-covered forests of Scandinavia, where people hunted on skis with rifles slung over their shoulders.

Biathlon-type events in Scandinavia are known to have been held as early as the 18th century. The first modern biathlon probably occurred in 1912, when the Norwegian military organized the Forvarsrennet in Oslo. An annual event, it consisted initially of a 17 km cross-country ski race with two-minute penalties incurred by misses in the shooting part of the competition.

Opción 1

Freestyle Skiing

Freestyle skiing combines speed, showmanship and the ability to perform aerial maneuvers whilst skiing. There are records of people performing somersaults on skis at the beginning of the 20th century in Norway, Italy and Austria, and in the early 1920s, U.S. skiers started to flip and spin. Freestyle skiing really began to take off in America during the 1960s, when social change and freedom of expression together with the advances in ski equipment led to the development of new and exciting skiing techniques.

Freestyle was recognized as a discipline by the International Ski Federation (FIS) in 1979. Freestyle skiing was contested as a demonstration sport at the 1988 Calgary Games. There were events for both men and women in all three events: moguls, aerials and ballet.

Figure Skating

Figure skating, as its name suggests, involves skating “figures” on ice. The sport requires competitors to skate selected patterns, or figures, as part of their routines. Ice skating has developed from a practical way to get around on ice into the elegant mix of art and sport it is today.

The Dutch were arguably the earliest pioneers of skating. They began using canals to maintain communication by skating from village to village as far back as the 13th century. Skating eventually spread across the channel to England, and soon the first clubs and artificial rinks began to form. Skaters must perform a set number of jumps in each routine in singles and pairs events and follow a set theme in ice dancing. Falls and other penalties are penalized with points deductions. The total score counts for the overall result.

Figure skating is the oldest sport on the Olympic Winter Games program. It was contested at the 1908 London Games (in summer) and again in 1920 in Antwerp (also in summer), pre-dating the first Olympic Winter Games.

Ice Hockey

Ice hockey is a fast, fluid and exciting team sport featuring two teams of six players (a goaltender and five skaters) on ice. It draws big crowds at the Olympic Games thanks to the drama and tension of the matches.

Ice hockey originated in Canada in the early 19th century, based on several similar sports played in Europe, although the word “hockey” comes from the old French word “hocquet”, meaning “stick”. Around 1860, a puck was substituted for a ball, and in 1879, two McGill University students, Robertson and Smith, devised the first rules.

Short Track

In short track speed skating, athletes compete not against the clock, but against each other. This introduces the elements of strategy, bravery and skill needed for racing.

Short track speed skating began in Canada and the United States of America, where they held mass-start competitions on an oval track as early as 1905-1906. Countries such as Great Britain, Australia, Belgium, France and Japan deserve a great deal of credit in the development of the sport, since they participated in international open competitions before the sport was recognized by the International Skating Union.

After having been a demonstration sport at the 1988 Games in Calgary, short track speed skating became part of the Olympic program in Albertville in 1992, with two individual events and two relays. The discipline comprises men’s and women’s events. Since the 2006 Olympic Games in Turin, the program of this discipline has included eight events.

Cross-Country Skiing

Cross-country skiing is the oldest type of skiing. It emerged from a need to travel over snow-covered terrain and developed as a sport at the end of the 19th century. For centuries in the snow-covered North, skis were required to chase game and gather firewood in wintertime. With long distances between the small, isolated communities and hard, snowy winters, skiing also became important as a means of keeping in social contact. The word “ski” is a Norwegian word which comes from the Old Norse word “skid”, a split length of wood.

The men’s event debuted at the first Winter Olympic Games in Chamonix in 1924, and the women’s event debuted at the 1952 Oslo Games. The sport has traditionally been dominated by the Nordic countries.

Snowboard

Snowboarding combines elements of surfing, skateboarding and skiing. Snowboarding was developed in the United States in the 1960s as people across the country began to seek out new winter activities. Over the next decade, various pioneers boosted the production of boards, and the sport began to gain crossover appeal. Surfers and skateboarders became involved, and by 1980, snowboarding was a nationwide activity.

The International Ski Federation (FIS) introduced snowboarding as a FIS discipline in 1994. This helped pave the way for snowboarding’s inclusion in the Olympic Winter Games. Men’s and women’s snowboarding made their Olympic debuts at the Nagano Games in 1998 with giant slalom and halfpipe competitions.